• People in small village are afraid for their lives, because killer rocks have been coming down and squashing people, as some middle-aged-to-older farmer-looking bald guy tells me. (Wait, what? You can’t farm in the mountains! Maybe he’s Swedish and has a pasture or something.)
  • It’s a kind of remote place with probably not more than 20 houses; story is told in monochrome. I realize this is a rather Twilight Zone-like plot.
  • I seem to be some kind of detective or something. I never actually got a look at my appearance, though.
  • I notice no killer rocks here, and move to the next village.
  • There are probably not more than 15 houses here (maybe not more than 10). I walk by one with an inset porch that happens to have a bottle cap lying around by it. There are mountains coming right up out of the ground not too far away which are not so very tall, more suggestive of a TV stage than a real place.
  • As I start to walk away from the first house near the exit, two massive and vaguely spherical chunks of rock spontaneously pull themselves out of the mountain, leaving holes in it, and start to bounce toward me. I stare at them in disbelief, then start running.
  • Oddly, as I go back toward the house with the inset porch, they pass right by me and go on toward the exit. Once they get there, they stop.
  • I run on past them, but then another pulls itself out of the mountain, leaving it in rather sad shape. “Are the mountains crumbling?” I ask. I think I was wondering if this disaster was brought on by some kind of fault in the mountains or if this was just the way they naturally degraded around here or something.
  • I at first think the new boulder is just going to bounce in a straight line like the other ones, but they instead turn a corner and follow me (the village is kind of L-shaped with a very broad top, and I’m heading into the foot).
  • Oddly, the boulder stops. I notice there is a bit of gold foil at my foot, like the sort they use to wrap chocolate coins. Suddenly I realise that the boulder “is lonely, and simply wants to be with its fellow minerals.”
  • I carry the bit of foil over to where the boulder is (a vaguely conical inset into the mountain) and set it there, and then go back to where I was. It doesn’t move.
  • Strangely, I find when I climb up a ladder set against the rock wall at the inside foot of the “L”, it transitions into bleachers, on which there are young people sitting and cheering as if there is a game going on. I climb back down and can no longer hear them.